How this doctor finally has more time for her patients

“Often patients keep coming back with the same complaints, but they also tell them about debts, a fight with the neighbors and their sadness,” explains Rebecca, who works in the Utrecht neighborhood of Ondiep. In a ten-minute consultation, she has too little time to see why the complaints don't go away. “Then sometimes I refer them to the hospital, while I actually already know that it will not produce anything.”

That is where the new neighborhood approach must go Powerful Basic Care bring change. The ten health centers receive extra resources for implementing the approach. Rebecca was able to hire an extra doctor from that money and extend the hours of her practice nurse. “That gives us breathing space during a busy day to match what the patient really needs. For example with longer consultations,” says Rebecca. “There is also more time to strengthen cooperation with other social workers in the neighborhood.”

Earlier doctors from the big cities rang the bell. The workload in disadvantaged neighborhoods became so high that colleagues dropped out or stopped. They asked politicians and health insurers for help. This approach seems to reduce the problems for GPs such as Rebecca and to increase the pleasure of working.

Floods in Indonesia: the death toll in Papua

At least 58 people were killed in floods in the Indonesian province of Papua, according to a new report announced Sunday by the disaster management agency.

Floods in Sentani, about 20 kilometers from the provincial capital of Jayapura, were caused by torrential rains on Saturday. Seventy people were injured and 4,150 evacuated.

“The number of victims and the impact of the disaster are likely to increase as rescue teams continue to attempt to gain access to other affected areas,” said agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho.

“It's a landslide” upstream of the area “that seems to be at the origin of the floods,” he said.

A significant number of houses were damaged. And if the water level begins to decrease, evacuations continue.

“Relief teams are evacuating but they have not reached all the affected areas because of fallen trees, rocks and mud” that block the lines of communication, detailed Sutopo Purwo Nugroho.

Video footage of the area showed rescuers oxygenating a victim trapped by a fallen tree.

Soldiers cleared a five-month-old baby who had been trapped for hours under debris, said army spokesman in Papua Muhammad Aidi. But we do not know where his parents are.

Uprooted trees and a lot of debris litter the roads, while at Jayapura airport a small plane appears damaged by the floods. The airport of the regional capital remains open, said however the Ministry of Transport.

Lilis Puji Hastuti, a 29-year-old woman living in Sentani, said she had to flee when water flooded her house up to her knees.

“We immediately took our business and went to seek refuge with our neighbor,” she told AFP.

The mother of two said she feared “in addition to floods, landslides, because we are right at the foot of the mountain”.

Dozens of wounded were transported to a tent where doctors come to their aid, an AFP journalist said.

The government declared a state of emergency for 14 days, police chief Victor Dean Mackbon said.

Floods are common during the rainy season in Indonesia from October to April.

In January, at least 70 people were killed in floods and landslides in the south of the island of Celebes.

In recent weeks, hundreds of people have had to evacuate around the Citarum River in West Java Province due to flooding.

The Indonesian province of Papua is located west of the island of New Guinea, the other half of which is shared by Papua New Guinea, a former Australian colony that has become independent.

It is one of the poorest regions in Indonesia, and the scene of sporadic clashes between separatist rebels and the army.

From the editorial staff: Big news from a distance, what do you do?

Immersive dynamics

Soon the focus is on the next broadcast. The role of News hour is mainly to search for context, interpretation, analysis. The first brainstorming sessions are therefore focused on this. About the perpetrator, his sources of inspiration, about New Zealand, the Muslim community there, comparisons with previous attacks and so much more.

It is a moving dynamic and typical of what journalism is: in one go you can be busy looking for answers to questions that you had never thought of five minutes before.

But there are also risks. Speed ​​can lead to blindness. Or to tunnel vision. That is perhaps the biggest pitfall of rapidly developing news with a lot of impact, of which not all the facts are known. Certainly in a world where the news circulates at lightning speed, true or half-true, checked or rumor.

If you stay behind as a medium, people are looking for another site, program or channel, reliable or not. Journalists do not like to say to their viewers or readers: “I don't know either, give me a few more hours.” Although that would sometimes be the most sensible answer. So we also do our work in that area of ​​tension, one time better than the other.

How the invisible war with drones becomes even more invisible

They can stay in the air for days, closely monitor targets and attack without risking your own people. It is these advantages that make it possible for the US to use armed drones on a large scale in the fight against terror.

But drone attacks also have a shadow side. Civilian casualties, and the fear of people on the ground becoming victims themselves.

To keep track of the number of civilian casualties, the CIA had to report annually on the number of civilian deaths. But that reporting obligation has recently come to an end.

And with that an already invisible war becomes even more shadowy:

The number of extreme storms will triple in Europe

BOMB. Three times more than Lothar and Martin! This is the result of the modeling of a team of researchers from the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. Lothar and Martin, it is these violent depressions which made 140 deaths and 20 billion damages in Europe during their passage between December 26 and 28, 1999. These extratropical cyclones are formed between the line of the tropics and the polar circle. They are caused by two air masses of very different temperatures that meteorologists describe as extremely powerful “bombs”. These exceptional storms, which occur during the winter but also in early summer, may well become more commonplace. Environmental research letters if nothing is done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Predicting cyclone activity by the end of the century is not an easy exercise. These are indeed weather events limited in time. What researchers are familiar with is the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship which states that a higher content of water vapor in the atmosphere caused by warmer temperatures causes more energy-laden and therefore more intense events. But, it is difficult to go further. The formation and trajectory of extratropical storms are influenced by parameters such as the temperature differential between the tropics and the north pole, the melting of Arctic ice, the position of the jet stream, the atmospheric current of altitude, the temperature contrasts between the ocean and continents and the very dynamics of depression. The latest IPCC report remains very cautious about the evolution of these storms, but rather predicts a decrease in their numbers, because the temperature differential between the tropics and the northern areas is expected to decrease. The depressions should also move north.

More violent storms will increase destruction and flooding

MODELS. For Europe, these changes are crucial because these weather episodes account for 80% of annual rainfall! The English team relied on the CIMP5 climate model which summarizes the results of 16 other climate models. This model has a resolution between 100 and 300 kilometers, able to reproduce these very local climatic phenomena. By feeding the algorithms recorded data of the average depressions between June and August and between December and February for both North America and Europe over the last two decades, the researchers obtained an increase for the Europe 180% of exceptional storms in summer and 230% between December and February.

We must temper the result. The researchers used the worst-case IPCC scenario, which postulates that the curve of greenhouse gas emissions continues on its current slope, leading to an increase in temperatures above 4.5 ° C at the end of the century. . But the team at the University of Exeter warns from the outset that Europe will have to prepare for these extreme events. If the total amount of rainfall is not expected to change significantly by the end of the century, the violence of the depressions should increase the number of catastrophic floods.

BOMB. Three times more than Lothar and Martin! This is the result of the modeling of a team of researchers from the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom. Lothar and Martin, it is these violent depressions which made 140 deaths and 20 billion damages in Europe during their passage between December 26 and 28, 1999. These extratropical cyclones are formed between the line of the tropics and the polar circle. They are caused by two air masses of very different temperatures that meteorologists describe as extremely powerful “bombs”. These exceptional storms, which occur during the winter but also in early summer, may well become more commonplace. Environmental research letters if nothing is done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Predicting cyclone activity by the end of the century is not an easy exercise. These are indeed weather events limited in time. What researchers are familiar with is the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship which states that a higher content of water vapor in the atmosphere caused by warmer temperatures causes more energy-laden and therefore more intense events. But, it is difficult to go further. The formation and trajectory of extratropical storms are influenced by parameters such as the temperature differential between the tropics and the north pole, the melting of Arctic ice, the position of the jet stream, the atmospheric current of altitude, the temperature contrasts between the ocean and continents and the very dynamics of depression. The latest IPCC report remains very cautious about the evolution of these storms, but rather predicts a decrease in their numbers, because the temperature differential between the tropics and the northern areas is expected to decrease. The depressions should also move north.

Christchurch: Press releases warn against rising legal terrorism – Trump sees it differently

The world is in thoughts in New Zealand. After the attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, worldwide horror and grief are boundless. At least 49 devout Muslims were killed. The international press comments:

London “Independent”: The massacres in Christchurch are a reminder that right-wing extremist – similar to Islamist – terrorism spreads globally. “

“Neue Zürcher Zeitung”: “The hatred of dissenters, people of other faiths or other-looking, so much is clear, is deeply rooted in all our societies and he is not limited to bearded men calling 'Allahu Akbar'.”

Italian daily “La Stampa”: “The attack has hit a part of the world where you thought and hoped to keep fanaticism in check, and now you have to deal with the enemy inside.”

Amsterdam newspaper “de Volkskrant”: “The multiethnic society is causing tensions, to dissolve or dismantle these tensions is an assignment to all, which requires an open debate.”

London Times: “The most urgent response of free societies to this terrorist attack must be to recognize the extent of the threat posed by right-wing extremism: a poisoned subculture of hostility towards Muslims and the spirit of a pluralistic society has been boosted in the information age.”

US President Donald Trump on the question of whether white nationalism is a growing threat worldwide:

“I think, not really, I think it's a small group of people who have very serious problems.”

Terrorist: Perpetrator Christchurch driven by alt-right ideology

Brenton Tarrant, the presumed shooter of the attack on two mosques in New Zealand, appears to be a supporter of the extreme right-wing ideology, says terrorism expert Jelle van Buuren. “It's in the corner that we now call alt-right.”

Breivik

Van Buuren bases his analysis on the manifesto that appeared on the internet just before the attack, in which Tarrant also seems to claim responsibility for his actions.

The 28-year-old Australian writes that he has anti-Islamic ideas. He says he strives for a “white domination” and that he himself will carry out a terrorist attack.

Q&A

“It is very remarkable that he built his manifesto in the form of a Q and A session “, says Van Buuren. “As if he's being interrogated by a journalist.” Are you crazy? No. Are you looking for attention? No. He is at the forefront of the questions that we could ask. He presents himself as a very normal boy. “

Tarrant further writes in his manifesto that he came specifically to New Zealand to carry out an attack. He writes to support nationalist groups but not to act on behalf of a group.

“He is a loner, but does represent a group,” says Van Buuren. “It is difficult to put one stamp on it. You can compare it with the Norwegian terrorist Anders Breivik, and also with the white nationalist who struck at the Pittsburgh Synagogue. “

Clues

If Tarrant is so clearly in the extreme right-hand corner, could the police not have found any indications in advance that he was going to commit an attack? “That depends on the traces and how widely they are spread,” says Van Buuren. “And how well he was monitored. There are examples of authorities that were on time. But there are also examples that the authorities were wrong.”

“In America, for example, someone posted hate videos on women, and when the police came to see him, he took a pious face and said,” Oh, I didn't know you were offended by it. ” you only had to walk a meter further, then you would have found my weapons'. “

Bianca walked around for 11 years with extreme menstrual pain, now she is infertile

Breaking of the pain during your period. For many women it appears to be a standard shot. For years, every month. But talking about this is a second thing. The largest ever study of menstrual problems, done by the Radboudumc, shows that only part of the women surveyed are open about pain during their period.

That must change, gynecologists say. Not talking about it can cause women to keep walking for too long with their pain. While it can be caused by underlying problems that can even lead to infertility.

Endometriosis is one such condition. In addition, the mucous membrane that normally sits inside the uterus adheres to the abdominal cavity. That hurts, often extra during menstruation.

Stifled fallopian tubes

“In a normal situation you have discomfort during the period, but it should not be so intense that you can no longer do your daily tasks,” says gynecologist Moniek van der Zanden. “All women must know: it is not normal if you have to report sick because of your period.”

Bianca (35) walked around for a long time with severe pain around her period. For years she was told that the pain was part of it, causing the endometriosis to cause irreparable damage: she became infertile because her fallopian tubes were suffocating.

In the video below Bianca tells her story and explains to NOS 3 why it is so important that we talk about menstrual pain:

“Grande America”: with backhoe and floating tubes, La Rochelle is ready

Backhoe loaders, gloves, absorbent products and floating rods: in La Rochelle (Charente-Maritime), everything is ready to fight against a pollution that threatens the coast after the sinking of the Italian ship Grande America.

On the old port, the DVG mayor of the city Jean-François Fountaine looks at the sea as a connoisseur. For this former skipper, who studied the weather charts, “the tablecloth will arrive Wednesday, or later,” he told AFP.

Since Tuesday, when the hybrid ship sank between a ro-ro and a container ship, two oil slicks drift to the coasts of Gironde and Charente-Maritime, two departments placed in “pre-alert” to anticipate any risk of pollution.

“At the level of the town hall,” assures the elected Rochelais, “we gathered road machinery, trucks, backhoe loaders, crane trucks, suction equipment, absorbent products and 150 municipal agents competent for this type of intervention. They can be mobilized as soon as the Polmar Terre plan is triggered by the prefecture, “he says.

The town hall has also placed a pre-order of personal protective equipment: gloves, coveralls, based on the most dramatic scenario.

In parallel, she launched a photo control of the beaches to be able to establish a zero point before the spill, for insurance. Water samples are taken to establish the health status of the sea before pollution and samples are studied under the control of the Regional Health Agency.

The port of Minimes, one of the largest marinas in Europe, also has “twenty staff trained to fight against pollution, on 56 employees,” says Anne Fontanaud, its Quality-Safety-Environment manager.

“We have 200 meters of floating dams, equipped with a skirt that contains the pollution, and 100 meters of floating rods, a boat of 7 meters and five other working, smaller.Our role is to prevent pollution of the sea. 'to enter the port but if need be, they are available to plan Polmar Land and could serve for the old port or elsewhere'.

– The fear of “dumplings” –

In this region famous for its oyster farms, it also takes its provisions.

“We have our stocks for this year and for the next year, which are at sea. We can not take the oysters out, we do not have any clear ones like in Marennes-Oléron, the only thing we can do is 'is out a part and pass in basin with clean water,' says Armand Bernard, oyster farmer in Aytré who also raises with his grandson oysters at sea at the tip of Grouin, on the island of Ré.

But he does not want to be worried: “It's still not the Amoco,” says the sexagenarian about the tanker Amoco Cadiz whose sinking caused a spectacular oil spill in Britain in 1978.

“Next week, there will be a big tide and then good weather, it should create a wind that will not affect our coast,” said Mr. Bernard, who cleans his oysters on a table .

“It all depends on the behavior of pollution,” adds Anne Fontanaud, “if it is an iridescent water, pellets or a compact tablecloth,” she adds.

The mayor of La Rochelle also fears the “dumplings” of oil and has already launched calls for the collection of waste on which they could stick.

Some high school students have already, without really knowing it, answered the call. On the pebble beach near the old town, they pick up bottles, old bits of fishing nets, plastic bags.

Caline Daveau, the mother of one of them, accompanies them: “What future will we leave for our children? We will leave a damaged planet, polluted.This oil spill + is dramatic for nature, wildlife It's a tragedy, “she says, arguing that” our children have a future. ”

Senate cancels Trump's national emergency

By

the 14.03.2019 at 19h56

The US Senate voted Thursday for a resolution to cancel the national emergency procedure decreed by Donald Trump to release funds needed to build a wall on the Mexican border.

Senate

The US Senate voted Thursday in favor of a resolution quashing the national emergency procedure decreed by Donald Trump.

AFP – SAUL LOEB